Trump vows to open his own wallet after his campaign blows through most of its money

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“Money money money money, MONEY!”
— The O’Jays – “For the Love of Money”
The very essence of Donald Trump’s life has always been the moolah, the gold-plated trappings it can buy, and the power and respect it conveys to those who have plentiful quantities of lucre.
Thus, the recent report in The New York Times citing the unexpected cash crunch currently being experienced by the Trump campaign strike to the very core of the president’s inexplicable mystique amongst his aspirational working-class supporters who see his supposed wealth, no matter how illicitly or crookedly gained, as a reason for admiration rather than revulsion.
The report claims that of the $1.1 billion that the Trump campaign and the Republican party managed to raise from the beginning of 2019 through July of this year, only around $300 million is left after a series of wanton and profligate expenditures to expressly satisfy the ego of the president.
Among the most wasteful outpourings of cash that the campaign squandered in order to please Donald Trump was an $11 million pair of ads during the 2020 Superbowl that were purchased to match the splashy primary ads for the then-Democratic contender, billionaire Michael Bloomberg, whose estimated $56.1 billion fortune dwarfs Fortune magazine’s guestimation of the president’s relatively puny net worth and likely inspires some serious envy in the dark recesses of Trump’s disordered mind.
Another useless waste of funds appears to have been dedicated to spending heavily on pro-Trump ads in the Washington DC market that were essentially purchased for an audience of one in order to give the insecure president the impression that he dominated the media landscape with his propaganda blitz.
With tales of high priced consultants, copious legal bills, and lavishly appointed offices, much of the blame for the downward decline of the president’s campaign coffers has been placed upon his Ferrari-driving former campaign manager Brad Parscale, who was replaced by a less free-spending Bill Stepien in July when the kink in the firehose of available campaign cash became too obvious to continue to ignore.
“If you spend $800 million and you’re 10 points behind, I think you’ve got to answer the question ‘What was the game plan?’” said Ed Rollins, a veteran Republican strategist who runs a small pro-Trump super PAC, and who accused Mr. Parscale of spending “like a drunken sailor.”
With such humiliating failures detailed in the public media, it was only natural that Donald Trump would be tweeting his indignant response to the latest allegations proving that his storied bankruptcies are more indicative of his business prowess (or lack thereof) than his ill-documented supposed fortune.
Trump’s defensive excuse for the campaign cash crunch is most notable for his vow to put his own money in the game since his explanations for the outflow of donated dollars lands squarely in “the dog ate my homework” territory.
“Money money money money, MONEY!
Some people got to have it
Some people really need it
Listen to me why’all, do things, do things, do bad things with it.”
Given the massive amount of money that the federal government and his Republican supporters have spent at Trump properties in the last four years, the president likely has some cash lying around to fulfill his vow to dig into his own pockets to try to salvage his candidacy.
Whether Trump would be better served by hoarding his available financial resources to pay for his likely gigantic legal expenditures once he is removed from office is an open question, but given his dearth of long-term strategic thinking thus far, he probably more inclined to make a last-ditch attempt to spend whatever he can to avoid the inevitable prosecutions by trying to retain his presidential immunity.
“For the love of money
People will steal from their mother
For the love of money
People will rob their own brother.”
“For the love of money
People can’t even walk the street
Because they never know who in the world they’re gonna beat
For that lean, mean, mean green
Almighty dollar, money.”
Live by the dollar, die by the dollar.
The fraudulent businessman becoming a fraudulent president and losing the opportunity for a second term because of financial mismanagement…priceless!

Join millions calling for AG Barr to resign after he defied his constitutional obligations to protect Trump!

Vinnie Longobardo

Vinnie Longobardo is a 35-year veteran of the TV, mobile, & internet industries, specializing in start-ups and the international media business. His passions are politics, music, and art.

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