Mueller’s investigators just accused Trump’s Attorney General of distorting their findings in his summary

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As the days pass and the Mueller Report slowly fades from public attention, its contents still hidden away by the president and his appointees, the authors of the report itself are growing increasingly worried that the real conclusions of their work are being lost to time as the narrative of “no conclusion and total exoneration!” sinks in.

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The New York Times reports that some of the investigators on Special Counsel Robert Mueller’s team have accused Attorney William Barr of having “failed to adequately portray the findings of their inquiry” and wanted to make sure the public knew that they “were more troubling for President Trump than Mr. Barr indicated.”

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They also charge that Barr failed to include important parts of the summaries of the report that they themselves wrote in the Justice Department’s official four-page summary that was released to Congress earlier this month.

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Ironically, Barr’s team pointed to James Comey’s letter to Congress on the even of the 2016 election about his decision to “reopen” the Hillary Clinton email server investigation for no real reason as justification for not releasing any “derogatory information” in the closing of the Trump-Russia investigation.

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It is “believed” that the investigators’ concerns revolve around the President’s efforts to obstruct and undermine the investigation into himself, according to officials familiar with the subject.

Yesterday, House Democrats voted to authorize the use of a subpoena to get the full text of the Mueller Report from Barr, who is currently working on redacting the document of confidential information, grand jury testimony, and information related to ongoing investigations. He says he’ll have his version done by mid-April.

Whether or not he’ll give us the goods remains to be seen.

Original reporting by Nicholas Fandos, Michael S. Schmidt and Mark Mazzetti at the New York Times.

Natalie Dickinson

Natalie is a staff writer for the Washington Press. She graduated from Oberlin College in 2010 and has been freelance blogging and writing for progressive outlets ever since.

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