A Jewish woman just wrote a powerful letter to a man in a Trump hat on her flight, and it’s breaking the internet

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The issue of “civility” and the best way to confront the growing tides of fascism in American society has been at the forefront of public discourse over the past few months.

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As right-wing violence and the incidence of hate crimes have escalated, left-wing frustration has visibly spiked while the spineless and disingenuous mewlings of the pearl-clutching and finger-wagging center remain as omnipresent as ever. With ideological tensions at an all-time high, the debate over the best and the healthiest way for people to engage with the people who disagree with them — or in the case of Trump fans, want to see people violently purged from the country — is on everyone’s minds.

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One woman is going viral on social media for the novel way in which she confronted her ideological enemy and a hateful symbol in a peaceful and civil manner.

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Merissa, who is Jewish, was deeply traumatized by the anti-Semitic massacre at the Tree of Life synagogue in Pittsburgh this weekend and flew home to Los Angeles to find comfort and mourn with her family.

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On her flight home, she noticed a man wearing one of President Trump’s red MAGA hats and wrote a powerful letter to him explaining how the red hat made her feel and how it was a representation of the hateful President, who deeply offended many people with his callous victim-blaming remarks following the massacre and his immediate return to promoting anti-Semitic conspiracy theories barely a day later.

The letter was shared on social media by a friend of hers, who was unable to report if her powerful words had any substantial effect on the Trumper.

Hopefully, her letter made him reconsider what the hat on his head really stands for — hatred, anti-Semitism, and xenophobia — and made him question whether this was a movement he really wants to be a part of.

Colin Taylor

Managing Editor

Colin Taylor is the managing editor of the Washington Press. He graduated from Bennington College with a Bachelor's degree in history and political science. He now focuses on advancing the cause of social justice, equality, and universal health care in America.

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